Updates

  • In the News: U.S. Department of Labor Secretary tours Baltimore training facility today

    U.S. Department of Labor Secretary tours Baltimore training facility today
    WBFF-TV

    On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Marty Walsh will join U.S. Rep John Sarbanes to tour the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 37’s training site in Baltimore, Maryland.

    He will also discuss the Biden-Harris administration’s historic investments in workforce training with labor leaders, apprentices and instructors.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Your Voice: Congressman John Sarbanes

    Your Voice: Congressman John Sarbanes
    WBFF-TV

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Labor Secretary Walsh visits Baltimore to discuss investments in workforce training

    Labor Secretary Walsh visits Baltimore to discuss investments in workforce training
    WBAL-TV

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Four Annapolis restaurant owners discuss surviving COVID-19 with Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris

    Four Annapolis restaurant owners discuss surviving COVID-19 with Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris
    Danielle Ohl, The Capital Gazette

    Four Annapolis restaurant owners who overcame hurdles to remain open during the COVID-19 pandemic met Tuesday morning with second gentleman Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris.

    Emhoff, the nation’s first second gentleman, has been traveling the country as an ambassador for the Biden administration, encouraging people to get vaccinated against COVID-19, raising awareness about various pandemic relief packages such as the American Rescue Plan and drumming up support for President Joe Biden’s jobs plan, an ambitious $2 trillion proposal.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Federal Lawmakers, City Officials Want Funding to End ‘Highway to Nowhere’

    Federal Lawmakers, City Officials Want Funding to End ‘Highway to Nowhere’
    Ron Cassie, Baltimore Magazine

    U.S. Senators Chris Van Hollen and Ben Cardin, with Maryland Congressmen Kweisi Mfume, John Sarbanes, and Anthony Brown, joined Mayor Brandon Scott on Monday to make the case for infrastructure funding to redress West Baltimore’s infamous “Highway to Nowhere.”

    Built in the late 1960s, the long-since scrapped urban highway was once intended to connect I-70 to downtown and link it to I-95 and I-83. Completion of the project was finally halted amid community opposition—in part led by then-community organizer Barbara Mikulski—from threatened neighborhoods along the proposed route. By that point, however, the damage had been done in West Baltimore where more than 970 homes, 60 businesses, and 1,500 local residents were displaced.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Maryland Democrats hope to remedy damage from decades-old ‘Highway to Nowhere’

    Maryland Democrats hope to remedy damage from decades-old ‘Highway to Nowhere’
    Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun

    Democratic members of Maryland’s congressional delegation expressed hope Monday that — for the first time in decades — there may be an opportunity for funding to redress damage done by West Baltimore’s so-called Highway to Nowhere.

    U.S. Rep. Kweisi Mfume and Sens. Chris Van Hollen and Ben Cardin stood in a parking lot overlooking a weed-filled field, the site of a project the lawmakers called a “monstrosity” that uprooted surrounding communities. The original plan was to connect Interstate 70 coming from the west with Interstate 95, but the project was halted in the early 1970s amid opposition from threatened neighborhoods along the proposed route and environmentalists.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: As States Add Voting Restrictions, Democrats Say Reform Bill By Maryland’s John Sarbanes Is ‘Vital to Protect Our Democracy’

    As States Add Voting Restrictions, Democrats Say Reform Bill By Maryland’s John Sarbanes Is ‘Vital to Protect Our Democracy’
    Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun

    Congressional Democrats are launching a concerted push on behalf of an ambitious voting rights and campaign reform bill sponsored by Rep. John Sarbanes of Maryland that backers say is urgently needed because voter access is being threatened around the country.

    Sarbanes’ legislation was years in the making and is a defining bill for the eighth-term lawmaker and son of the late U.S. Sen. Paul Sarbanes.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Sarbanes Emphasizes Election Reform in Meeting With Howard County Lawmakers

    Sarbanes Emphasizes Election Reform in Meeting With Howard County Lawmakers
    Bennett Leckrone, Maryland Matters

    U.S. Rep. John P. Sarbanes (D-Md.) touted his sweeping federal election overhaul to state legislators from Howard County in a Wednesday morning meeting, saying the proposed reforms are the “most requested anti-corruption legislation” ever passed by the House of Representatives.

    Sarbanes is the primary architect of the For the People Act, an omnibus proposal that would cut back on gerrymandering, expand absentee ballot access and modernize voter registration. Those are just a few of the slew of election reform efforts included in the legislation, which is currently in the Senate after passing the House in early March.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Maryland Lawmakers Announce Emergency Funding For Baltimore's Most Vulnerable

    Maryland Lawmakers Announce Emergency Funding For Baltimore's Most Vulnerable
    William Smink, WBFF (FOX)

    On Tuesday, U.S. Senators Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen along side Congressmen Dutch Ruppersberger, John Sarbanes and Kweisi Mfume came together to announce $15.45 million in emergency federal funding to reimburse the delivery of essential goods and shelter to the city of Baltimore's most vulnerable residents.

    The award serves as a total federal cost share reimbursement for services that Baltimore city provided to residents earlier in the pandemic.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Biden promises tight US-Greek ties

    Biden promises tight US-Greek ties
    Ekathimerini

    On the occasion of the bicentennial of the Greek War of Independence, the White House organized an online get-together with President Joe Biden and prominent members of the Greek-American Community Thursday.

    The event was coordinated by Biden’s press secretary, Jen Psaki. Biden regretted not being able to host the event in the White House, adding that he could see a lot of good friends on the screen.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Md. Congressional Democrats Urge USPS to Fix ‘One of Worst Postal Backlogs in the Country’

    Md. Congressional Democrats Urge USPS to Fix ‘One of Worst Postal Backlogs in the Country’
    Bryan Gallion, Montgomery County Media

    Maryland congressional Democrats called on the U.S. Postal Service to address mail delivery problems that the state has faced in recent months following a meeting they had Monday with agency officials.

    The state has “experienced one of the worst postal backlogs in the country,” the federal lawmakers said in a statement Tuesday, “and there are no excuses for the widespread breakdown of mail delivery.”

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Officials break ground on latest phase of Port Covington development

    Officials break ground on latest phase of Port Covington development
    Bryna Zumer, WBFF Online (FOX)

    Officials and community leaders broke ground today on the latest phase of South Baltimore's Port Covington project, which promises to bring 1.1 million square feet of new development, including 89 affordable-housing units.

    This latest phase is called 1B and will feature vertical construction, according to a press release.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Maryland Democrats Pay Tribute To AFA On 11th Anniversary

    Maryland Democrats Pay Tribute To AFA On 11th Anniversary
    Dan Shalin, Owings Mills Patch

    Rep. John Sarbanes, D-MD, marked the 11th anniversary of the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Tuesday by discussing how the legislation has been strengthened thanks to the passage of American Rescue Plan (ARP), the $1.6 trillion relief package signed into law earlier this month.

    Speaking at a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing, Sarbanes said the coronavirus relief bill is another step in achieving the goals of the AFA, helping more Americans gain access to high-quality and affordable health care.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Bipartisan, bicameral legislation seeks to support federal firefighters

    Bipartisan, bicameral legislation seeks to support federal firefighters
    Douglas Clark, Homeland Preparedness News

    Sens. Tom Carper (D-DE), Susan Collins (R-ME) and Jon Tester (D-MT), Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), and Rep. John Sarbanes (D-MD) reintroduced legislation last week designed to support federal firefighters by correcting disparity between federal firefighters and state, local and municipal firefighters.

    The Federal Firefighter Flexibility and Fairness Act would allow federal firefighters to engage in trade time, enabling two firefighters to trade shifts without affecting pay or using annual leave.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Federal American Rescue Plan includes millions for county, transit, education

    Federal American Rescue Plan includes millions for county, transit, education
    Briana Adhikusuma, Bethesda Magazine

    More than $303 million is expected to come to Montgomery County and its municipalities through the new federal American Rescue Plan.

    The county also will benefit through hundreds of millions of dollars more for local transit projects serving the region and for local schools.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Biden Has One Shot To Stop Republicans’ Voter Suppression Crusade

    Biden Has One Shot To Stop Republicans’ Voter Suppression Crusade
    Eric Lutz, Vanity Fair ('Hive')

    Earlier this month, Joe Biden signed an executive order to ensure that Americans’ right to vote is “protected and defended”—a move that came as Republicans across the country intensify their attacks on the voting rights of Black Americans and other marginalized groups, who already face systemic barriers. “We’ve seen an unprecedented insurrection in our Capitol and a brutal attack on our democracy on January 6—a never-before-seen effort to ignore, undermine, and undo the will of the people,” Biden said in a video statement. “It’s been followed by an all-out assault on the right to vote in state legislatures all across the country,” he continued, citing the hundreds of bills that have been introduced in 43 states to dramatically roll back voting rights. “We cannot let them succeed.”

    But Biden could find himself helping Republicans do just that if he doesn’t change his position on the Senate filibuster. Led by progressives, a growing chorus of Democrats have been calling to abolish or at least modify the filibuster to make it harder for Mitch McConnell and the GOP minority to obstruct their agenda. Those demands have taken on a greater sense of urgency amid Republican disenfranchisement efforts. With state lawmakers across the country using Donald Trump’s bogus election fraud claims to push wildly restrictive voting laws, and the Supreme Court, to which he appointed three justices, potentially on the cusp of dealing another blow to the Voting Rights Act, Democrats and activists have rallied behind HR1, a sweeping bill to secure elections, expand voting access, and restore the pro-democracy law named for the late John Lewis. It passed the House March 3. “At a time when Americans across the political spectrum are demanding real change and accountability from their elected officials, it’s more important than ever to deliver on the promise of HR1 and restore faith in our democracy,” Representative John Sarbanes, who introduced the bill, said upon its passage. “We have no time to waste.”

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Senate Gets Landmark Voting Legislation, But Partisanship Poses Steep Challenges

    Senate Gets Landmark Voting Legislation, But Partisanship Poses Steep Challenges
    Jennifer Mandato, Capital News Service

    A House-passed package overhauling voting, improving election security and reforming campaign finance laws is now in the Senate, where deep partisan divisions spell an uncertain fate for the landmark bill.

    H.R. 1, also known as the For the People Act of 2021, is sponsored by Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Towson, and co-sponsored by every House Democrat. The measure passed the House March 3 on a 220-210 party-line vote.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: How Many GOP House Members Are Mired in Conflicts of Interest? No One Knows

    How Many GOP House Members Are Mired in Conflicts of Interest? No One Knows
    Jon Skolnik, Newsweek

    After Congress passed the Paycheck Protection Program last year, pumping billions of dollars into small businesses struggling under the weight of the pandemic, reports surfaced that sizable chunks of that money went right back into the pockets of Congress. A slew of members, many of them already wealthy, received millions in federal aid for their personal businesses ventures under the auspices of job-saving. That reanimated debate about a longstanding, conflict of interest entrenched within the legislative branch: Members of Congress can hold positions in for-profit corporations while officially serving their constituents in Washington. 

    Senate ethics rules address this conflict —but the House does not. Senators are prohibited from "from serving as officers or members of the board of any publicly held or publicly regulated corporation, financial institution, or business entity." No such stricture applies to members of the House. Rules restrict all members of both chambers from making 15% in excess of their salaries in "outside earned income," but passive income derived from investments and holdings doesn't necessarily count.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Congressional working group to explore designating a Chesapeake National Recreation Area

    Congressional working group to explore designating a Chesapeake National Recreation Area
    Christine Condon, The Baltimore Sun

    Maryland congressional leaders announced a working group that will consider establishing a National Recreation Area for the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

    The recreation area would be managed by the National Park Service, which proponents say would make additional resources available for conservation and recreation in the bay area.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: As states crack down on voting, advocates look to Congress

    As states crack down on voting, advocates look to Congress
    Benjamin Barber, Facing South

    This past weekend marked the 56th anniversary of Bloody Sunday in Selma, Alabama, when voting rights marchers were brutally assaulted by law enforcement officers while crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Broadcast on national television, images of state troopers attacking peaceful demonstrators, including John Lewis, a civil rights icon who went on to become a long-serving Democratic congressman from Georgia, shifted public opinion and galvanized Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA).

    This year's commemoration — the first since Lewis's death last year from cancer — took place as many state legislatures are ramping up an assault on voting rights.

    Click here to continue reading.

Pages