News

  • In the News: Coronavirus Relief: More Than $9M Going Toward COVID-19 Housing Relief For Marylanders

    Coronavirus Relief: More Than $9M Going Toward COVID-19 Housing Relief For Marylanders
    WJZ-TV (Online)

    More than $9 million is being directed to COVID-19 housing relief for Marylanders for tenant-based housing voucher recipients.

    The full Maryland congressional delegation, which includes U.S. Senators Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen and Congressmen Steny H. Hoyer, Dutch Ruppersberger, John P. Sarbanes, Andy Harris, M.D., Anthony G. Brown, Jamie B. Raskin and David Trone, announced the funding on Thursday.

    The funding comes from the CARES Act, which is provided $1.25 billion nationwide for tenant-based rental assistance to help with the Housing Choice Voucher program. It includes $400 million for increased subsidy costs, which are paid directly to landlords and $850 million for administration and other expenses incurred by public housing authorities to “support or maintain the health and safety of assisted individuals and families, and costs related to retention and support of participating owners.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Johns Hopkins gets $200K in federal funding for COVID-19 tracker

    Johns Hopkins gets $200K in federal funding for COVID-19 tracker
    Will Vitka, WTOP (Online)

    Johns Hopkins University’s global COVID-19 tracker, which has served as a valuable tool for tracking the coronavirus since the map was publicly released in January, is getting a $200,000 injection of federal funding.

    Sens. Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen, and Reps. Dutch Ruppersberger and John P. Sarbanes, Democrats who represent Maryland, made the announcement Wednesday.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Maryland delegation calls on Trump to allow use of federal facilities for coronavirus testing

    Maryland delegation calls on Trump to allow use of federal facilities for coronavirus testing
    Ovetta Wiggins, The Washington Post

    Members of the Maryland congressional delegation urged President Trump to allow the state to use federal facilities, such as Fort Meade and the National Institutes of Health, for coronavirus testing. In a letter to the president, the delegation said that designating the National Capital Region as a federally supported testing site is critical for the increased testing needed to reopen the region.... The congressional letter is signed by Reps. Anthony G. Brown (D), Steny H. Hoyer (D), Andy Harris (R), C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger (D), John Sarbanes (D), Jamie B. Raskin (D), David Trone (D) and Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D).

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: What Comes After the Federal Relief Bill?

    What Comes After the Federal Relief Bill?
    WBFF-TV (FOX)

    Click here to continue watching.

  • In the News: After government funding for small businesses ran out, can a new stimulus bill help them?

    After government funding for small businesses ran out, can a new stimulus bill help them?
    Ariane Datil, WUSA-TV (CBS)

    This week on #TheQandA we’re focused on getting you answers about resources for small businesses.

    So far Congress has passed more than $2.2 trillion dollars of stimulus funding. Part of that funding is being distributed to individuals and small businesses through the CARES Act.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: If COVID-19 has shutdown much of the country, why hasn't the 2020 Census been delayed?

    If COVID-19 has shutdown much of the country, why hasn't the 2020 Census been delayed?
    WUSA-TV (Online)

    Larry Miller explores with Congressman John Sarbanes calls for delay of the census and what restrictions the Constitution places on this process.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Md. Lawmakers Call For Consideration of Hotspots, Rural Areas in CARES Act Hospital Funding

    Md. Lawmakers Call For Consideration of Hotspots, Rural Areas in CARES Act Hospital Funding
    Hannah Gaskill, Maryland Matters

    The Maryland congressional delegation sent a letter Tuesday to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, urging him to reconsider how future money is allocated to Maryland hospitals under the CARES Act, which Congress passed late last month.

    The delegation specifically has asked department Secretary Alex Azar to consider COVID-19 hot spots and under-served areas of the state in future disbursements, with an eye towards transparency in the decision-making process.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Students at Maryland Colleges and Universities to Benefit From Federal CARES Act

    Students at Maryland Colleges and Universities to Benefit From Federal CARES Act
    Hannah Gaskill, Maryland Matters

    Maryland’s congressional delegation said Monday that the state’s colleges and universities will receive over $170 million in federal aid through a measure in the CARES Act that Congress passed late last month.

    U.S. Sens. Chirs Van Hollen (D-Md.), Benjamin L. Cardin (D-Md.) and Reps. Steny H. Hoyer, C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, John P. Sarbanes, Andrew P. Harris, Anthony G. Brown, Jamie B. Raskin and David J. Trone jointly announced that Maryland is in line for $170,544,958 in funding, half of which is to be applied directly to assistance efforts for students confronting emergency expenses in the face of the public health crisis. 

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Van Hollen, Sarbanes Say Maryland Has Received Only a Third of Fema Requested Items

    Van Hollen, Sarbanes Say Maryland Has Received Only a Third of Fema Requested Items
    Veronica Canales, Montgomery County Media

    Congressman John Sarbanes (D-Md.) along with the Maryland Congressional Delegation are urging FEMA to fulfill the state’s request, claiming that Maryland has only received about a third of supplies requested.

    As of Friday morning, there are 2,758 confirmed cases in the state of Maryland and the total number of deaths due to COVID-19 are 42.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Fighting corruption starts with reducing big donor influence

    Fighting corruption starts with reducing big donor influence
    John Sarbanes, The Baltimore Sun (LTE)

    The Baltimore Sun editorial board is right on the money about our city’s brand new Fair Elections Fund (“Here’s how $2.5M can help protect Baltimore residents against public corruption,” March 9). To bolster confidence in our political system, small donors must be empowered to compete with deep-pocketed special interests. Baltimore’s groundbreaking effort to institute a citizen-owned clean elections system can get us there.

    The Baltimore City Fair Elections Fund will create a multiple match system for small donations, leveraging the influence of average citizens and giving them a greater voice in the political process. The fund will also enable a more diverse group of candidates to run and compete in campaigns because merit, not money, will determine the viability of their campaigns. Once elected, their allegiance will be to the people, ensuring that they make policy for the public interest, not the special interests.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Md. Congressional Dems Make Honor Roll in Green Group’s Annual Report Card

    Md. Congressional Dems Make Honor Roll in Green Group’s Annual Report Card
    Josh Kurtz, Maryland Matters

    The nine Democrats in Maryland’s congressional delegation scored perfect or near-perfect scores from a leading national environmental group in 2019, according to a just-released scorecard of House and Senate votes.

    The state’s lone congressional Republican, U.S. Rep. Andrew P. Harris, scored zero on the report card from the League of Conservation Voters.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: The Coronavirus Aid Package signed

    The Coronavirus Aid Package signed
    Jason Newton, WBAL-TV (Online)

  • In the News: Bill Would Boost Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup

    Bill Would Boost Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
    Pat Warren, WJZ-TV (Online)

    Maryland’s greatest natural resource is getting attention in Congress.

    The Chesapeake Bay Funding Reauthorization Act provides $90.5 million a year for five years. According to the Choose Clean Water Coalition, more than two-thirds of the program’s funds are passed through to the states and local communities for on-the-ground restoration work.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: More Addiction Treatment Docs Needed for Opioid Crisis, House Panel Told

    More Addiction Treatment Docs Needed for Opioid Crisis, House Panel Told
    Joyce Frieden, MedPage Today

    The opioid crisis and growing addiction to methamphetamine and other stimulants won't be abated until the country trains more addiction medicine physicians, witnesses said at a House Energy & Commerce Health Subcommittee hearing.

    "One of the things the opioid epidemic has laid bare is the lack of trained professionals we have to provide treatment, so we can put out all the funding dollars we want" but it won't do any good without a trained workforce, said Michael Botticelli, executive director of the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center. "I think it's really important for us to ensure that while we're doing other activities such as integrating addiction treatment into residency training, that having a trained workforce of addiction medicine and addiction psychiatrists is critical."

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Lawmakers: U.S. Rep. Sarbanes: Senate must act on 2020 election security

    U.S. Rep. Sarbanes: Senate must act on 2020 election security
    John Sarbanes, The Baltimore Sun (Op-Ed)

    Recent reporting underscores the alarming vulnerabilities that exist in voting systems across the country (“Voting machines face new criticism,” Feb. 24). As the 2020 election rapidly approaches, we must act urgently to protect our elections and guard against foreign interference.

    In Congress, the Democratic-led U.S. House of Representatives has made election security a top priority. As our first order of business, we passed H.R. 1, the For the People Act, the most sweeping anti-corruption bill in a generation which included significant election security reforms and resources. Soon after, we passed H.R. 2722, the Securing America’s Federal Elections (SAFE) Act, a comprehensive effort to modernize election systems in every state by increasing the adoption of paper ballots and ensuring the accuracy of vote tallies. We also passed H.R. 4617, the Stopping Harmful Interference in Elections for a Lasting Democracy (SHIELD) Act, a bipartisan bill to counter foreign interference in our democracy.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Senate must act on 2020 election security

    Senate must act on 2020 election security
    John Sarbanes, The Baltimore Sun (LTE)

    Recent reporting underscores the alarming vulnerabilities that exist in voting systems across the country (“Voting machines face new criticism,” Feb. 24). As the 2020 election rapidly approaches, we must act urgently to protect our elections and guard against foreign interference.

    In Congress, the Democratic-led U.S. House of Representatives has made election security a top priority. As our first order of business, we passed H.R. 1, the For the People Act, the most sweeping anti-corruption bill in a generation which included significant election security reforms and resources. Soon after, we passed H.R. 2722, the Securing America’s Federal Elections (SAFE) Act, a comprehensive effort to modernize election systems in every state by increasing the adoption of paper ballots and ensuring the accuracy of vote tallies. We also passed H.R. 4617, the Stopping Harmful Interference in Elections for a Lasting Democracy (SHIELD) Act, a bipartisan bill to counter foreign interference in our democracy.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: An inclusive democracy Demands DC statehood

    An inclusive democracy Demands DC statehood
    Eleanor Holmes Norton and John Sarbanes, The Hill (Op-Ed)

    Every student learns that the American Revolution was born, at least in part, out of the conviction that there can be “no taxation without representation.” More than just a slogan, this rallying cry represents the essence of self-determination – the fundamental right of all people to be ruled by their own hand and to choose their own government.

    Over two centuries, we have built upon that core principle, with painstaking and persistent work, to make our democracy more representative and inclusive. But today, we face significant structural challenges that threaten the state of our democracy and undermine our right to self-rule.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Olszewski discusses Prescription Drug Affordability Initiative with board members

    Olszewski discusses Prescription Drug Affordability Initiative with board members
    Charlene Mayo, The Dundalk Eagle

    Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski joined a panel of lawmakers and Maryland Prescription Drug Affordability Board members at Oak Crest Senior Living Community on Feb. 18 to hear from the public about the burden of paying for their prescription medications.

    U.S. Representative John Sarbanes, D-3, AARP representative Jim Gutman, Maryland’s Citizens’ Health Initiative President Vincent DeMarco and Maryland Prescription Drug Affordability Board member Dr. Ebere Onukwugha, along with Olszewski, led the second public forum in a series of events around the state.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: John Sarbanes and Brian Frosh: Working to Reduce Youth Vaping and Tobacco Use

    Working to Reduce Youth Vaping and Tobacco Use
    John Sarbanes and Brian Frosh, Maryland Matters (Op-Ed)

    With the alarming rise in vaping among teenagers and adolescents, a new public health crisis is unfolding right before our eyes. At the state and federal level, we must move swiftly to protect our children from the harmful, and sometimes deadly, effects of vaping.

    The number of middle and high school students using e-cigarettes rose from 3.6 million in 2018 to 5.4 million in 2019 – a 50% increase in a single year. This spike in e-cigarette use has coincided with a significant surge in vaping-related illnesses nationwide. In 2019 alone, the Centers for Disease Control reported 2,506 vaping-related illnesses, including 54 deaths, with nearly 200 new cases reported each week.

    Click here to continue reading.

  • In the News: Oak Crest Hosts Government Forum on Prescription Drugs

    Oak Crest Hosts Government Forum on Prescription Drugs
    Jeff Getek, Patch

    Oak Crest was proud to serve as the Baltimore County host for the Maryland Prescription Drug Affordability Board (MPDA) listening session on the evening of February 18. More than 75 residents welcomed the opportunity to attend the forum and provide input on the cost of prescription drugs and related issues.

    The panelists for the event were Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski, MPDA Board Member Ebere Onukwugha, Maryland AARP Advocate Jim Gutman and Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative President Vincent DeMarco. Congressman John Sarbanes, whose district includes Oak Crest, attended the forum and provided remarks.

    Click here to continue reading.

Pages