News

  • In the News: Van Hollen, Sarbanes Say Maryland Has Received Only a Third of Fema Requested Items

    Van Hollen, Sarbanes Say Maryland Has Received Only a Third of Fema Requested Items
    Veronica Canales, Montgomery County Media

    Congressman John Sarbanes (D-Md.) along with the Maryland Congressional Delegation are urging FEMA to fulfill the state’s request, claiming that Maryland has only received about a third of supplies requested.

    As of Friday morning, there are 2,758 confirmed cases in the state of Maryland and the total number of deaths due to COVID-19 are 42.

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  • In the News: Fighting corruption starts with reducing big donor influence

    Fighting corruption starts with reducing big donor influence
    John Sarbanes, The Baltimore Sun (LTE)

    The Baltimore Sun editorial board is right on the money about our city’s brand new Fair Elections Fund (“Here’s how $2.5M can help protect Baltimore residents against public corruption,” March 9). To bolster confidence in our political system, small donors must be empowered to compete with deep-pocketed special interests. Baltimore’s groundbreaking effort to institute a citizen-owned clean elections system can get us there.

    The Baltimore City Fair Elections Fund will create a multiple match system for small donations, leveraging the influence of average citizens and giving them a greater voice in the political process. The fund will also enable a more diverse group of candidates to run and compete in campaigns because merit, not money, will determine the viability of their campaigns. Once elected, their allegiance will be to the people, ensuring that they make policy for the public interest, not the special interests.

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  • In the News: Md. Congressional Dems Make Honor Roll in Green Group’s Annual Report Card

    Md. Congressional Dems Make Honor Roll in Green Group’s Annual Report Card
    Josh Kurtz, Maryland Matters

    The nine Democrats in Maryland’s congressional delegation scored perfect or near-perfect scores from a leading national environmental group in 2019, according to a just-released scorecard of House and Senate votes.

    The state’s lone congressional Republican, U.S. Rep. Andrew P. Harris, scored zero on the report card from the League of Conservation Voters.

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  • In the News: The Coronavirus Aid Package signed

    The Coronavirus Aid Package signed
    Jason Newton, WBAL-TV (Online)

  • In the News: Bill Would Boost Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup

    Bill Would Boost Funding For Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
    Pat Warren, WJZ-TV (Online)

    Maryland’s greatest natural resource is getting attention in Congress.

    The Chesapeake Bay Funding Reauthorization Act provides $90.5 million a year for five years. According to the Choose Clean Water Coalition, more than two-thirds of the program’s funds are passed through to the states and local communities for on-the-ground restoration work.

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  • In the News: More Addiction Treatment Docs Needed for Opioid Crisis, House Panel Told

    More Addiction Treatment Docs Needed for Opioid Crisis, House Panel Told
    Joyce Frieden, MedPage Today

    The opioid crisis and growing addiction to methamphetamine and other stimulants won't be abated until the country trains more addiction medicine physicians, witnesses said at a House Energy & Commerce Health Subcommittee hearing.

    "One of the things the opioid epidemic has laid bare is the lack of trained professionals we have to provide treatment, so we can put out all the funding dollars we want" but it won't do any good without a trained workforce, said Michael Botticelli, executive director of the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center. "I think it's really important for us to ensure that while we're doing other activities such as integrating addiction treatment into residency training, that having a trained workforce of addiction medicine and addiction psychiatrists is critical."

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  • In the News: Senate must act on 2020 election security

    Senate must act on 2020 election security
    John Sarbanes, The Baltimore Sun (LTE)

    Recent reporting underscores the alarming vulnerabilities that exist in voting systems across the country (“Voting machines face new criticism,” Feb. 24). As the 2020 election rapidly approaches, we must act urgently to protect our elections and guard against foreign interference.

    In Congress, the Democratic-led U.S. House of Representatives has made election security a top priority. As our first order of business, we passed H.R. 1, the For the People Act, the most sweeping anti-corruption bill in a generation which included significant election security reforms and resources. Soon after, we passed H.R. 2722, the Securing America’s Federal Elections (SAFE) Act, a comprehensive effort to modernize election systems in every state by increasing the adoption of paper ballots and ensuring the accuracy of vote tallies. We also passed H.R. 4617, the Stopping Harmful Interference in Elections for a Lasting Democracy (SHIELD) Act, a bipartisan bill to counter foreign interference in our democracy.

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  • In the News: Lawmakers: U.S. Rep. Sarbanes: Senate must act on 2020 election security

    U.S. Rep. Sarbanes: Senate must act on 2020 election security
    John Sarbanes, The Baltimore Sun (Op-Ed)

    Recent reporting underscores the alarming vulnerabilities that exist in voting systems across the country (“Voting machines face new criticism,” Feb. 24). As the 2020 election rapidly approaches, we must act urgently to protect our elections and guard against foreign interference.

    In Congress, the Democratic-led U.S. House of Representatives has made election security a top priority. As our first order of business, we passed H.R. 1, the For the People Act, the most sweeping anti-corruption bill in a generation which included significant election security reforms and resources. Soon after, we passed H.R. 2722, the Securing America’s Federal Elections (SAFE) Act, a comprehensive effort to modernize election systems in every state by increasing the adoption of paper ballots and ensuring the accuracy of vote tallies. We also passed H.R. 4617, the Stopping Harmful Interference in Elections for a Lasting Democracy (SHIELD) Act, a bipartisan bill to counter foreign interference in our democracy.

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  • In the News: Olszewski discusses Prescription Drug Affordability Initiative with board members

    Olszewski discusses Prescription Drug Affordability Initiative with board members
    Charlene Mayo, The Dundalk Eagle

    Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski joined a panel of lawmakers and Maryland Prescription Drug Affordability Board members at Oak Crest Senior Living Community on Feb. 18 to hear from the public about the burden of paying for their prescription medications.

    U.S. Representative John Sarbanes, D-3, AARP representative Jim Gutman, Maryland’s Citizens’ Health Initiative President Vincent DeMarco and Maryland Prescription Drug Affordability Board member Dr. Ebere Onukwugha, along with Olszewski, led the second public forum in a series of events around the state.

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  • In the News: An inclusive democracy Demands DC statehood

    An inclusive democracy Demands DC statehood
    Eleanor Holmes Norton and John Sarbanes, The Hill (Op-Ed)

    Every student learns that the American Revolution was born, at least in part, out of the conviction that there can be “no taxation without representation.” More than just a slogan, this rallying cry represents the essence of self-determination – the fundamental right of all people to be ruled by their own hand and to choose their own government.

    Over two centuries, we have built upon that core principle, with painstaking and persistent work, to make our democracy more representative and inclusive. But today, we face significant structural challenges that threaten the state of our democracy and undermine our right to self-rule.

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  • In the News: John Sarbanes and Brian Frosh: Working to Reduce Youth Vaping and Tobacco Use

    Working to Reduce Youth Vaping and Tobacco Use
    John Sarbanes and Brian Frosh, Maryland Matters (Op-Ed)

    With the alarming rise in vaping among teenagers and adolescents, a new public health crisis is unfolding right before our eyes. At the state and federal level, we must move swiftly to protect our children from the harmful, and sometimes deadly, effects of vaping.

    The number of middle and high school students using e-cigarettes rose from 3.6 million in 2018 to 5.4 million in 2019 – a 50% increase in a single year. This spike in e-cigarette use has coincided with a significant surge in vaping-related illnesses nationwide. In 2019 alone, the Centers for Disease Control reported 2,506 vaping-related illnesses, including 54 deaths, with nearly 200 new cases reported each week.

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  • In the News: Oak Crest Hosts Government Forum on Prescription Drugs

    Oak Crest Hosts Government Forum on Prescription Drugs
    Jeff Getek, Patch

    Oak Crest was proud to serve as the Baltimore County host for the Maryland Prescription Drug Affordability Board (MPDA) listening session on the evening of February 18. More than 75 residents welcomed the opportunity to attend the forum and provide input on the cost of prescription drugs and related issues.

    The panelists for the event were Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski, MPDA Board Member Ebere Onukwugha, Maryland AARP Advocate Jim Gutman and Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative President Vincent DeMarco. Congressman John Sarbanes, whose district includes Oak Crest, attended the forum and provided remarks.

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  • In the News: The 2020 Census could be the next big hacking and disinformation target

    The 2020 Census could be the next big hacking and disinformation target
    Joseph Marks, The Washington Post

    Lawmakers are growing increasingly alarmed about hacking dangers targeting the 2020 Census after a watchdog detailed dozens of high-risk cybersecurity problems that should have been fixed a long time ago.

    The hacking danger could be compounded by social media misinformation spread by U.S. adversaries or pranksters falsely claiming that census data is corrupted or the count is rigged, according to the Government Accountability Office report released during a House Oversight Committee hearing yesterday.

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  • In the News: In An Echo Of The Big Tobacco Hearings, Top E-Cigarette Execs Admit Nicotine Is Addictive

    In An Echo Of The Big Tobacco Hearings, Top E-Cigarette Execs Admit Nicotine Is Addictive
    John Daley, Colorado Public News Radio

    Leaders of the five largest e-cigarette companies in the U.S. faced a House committee and affirmed, under oath, the addictive nature of their products.

    In a moment that echoed the iconic tobacco hearings of the 90s, Rep. Diane DeGette, a Democrat from Colorado, asked each CEO, "Isn't it true that nicotine is addictive?"

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  • In the News: Democrats say Americans want witnesses at Trump impeachment trial

    Democrats say Americans want witnesses at Trump impeachment trial
    Stephen Loiaconi, WSYX (Online)

    As senators inched closer Wednesday to a pivotal vote on whether to hear from new witnesses in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, House Democrats argued allowing additional testimony is the only way to ensure the public considers the proceedings fair.

    “The American people understand a trial means witnesses and the admission of documentary evidence,” said Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I. “You can’t have a trial without witnesses. If you have no evidence and no witnesses, you don’t have a trial. You have a cover-up for the president.”

     

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  • In the News: Religious Leaders React to Proposed Increase in Funding to Prevent Hate Crimes

    Religious Leaders React to Proposed Increase in Funding to Prevent Hate Crimes
    Evan Greenberg, Baltimore Magazine

    Over the course of 12 days in November 2016, United Maryland Muslim Council director Mubariz Razvi and his wife were camped at the University of Maryland Medical Center’s shock trauma ward. Their adopted 23-year-old son, Ali Shah, was suffering from sepsis, on life support, and unfortunately, didn’t have much time left to live.

    Around a week into agonizing over Shah’s health, a woman saw that the ward doorway was clear, walked into the room, and rudely confronted Razvi.

     

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  • In the News: Lawmakers begin the push for a 3.5% federal pay raise in 2021

    Lawmakers begin the push for a 3.5% federal pay raise in 2021
    Nicole Ogrysko, Federal News Network

    In keeping with what’s become an annual tradition, a bicameral pair of Democrats have introduced legislation to ensure employees receive a federal pay raise in 2021.

    Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) and Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) have reintroduced the Federal Adjustment of Income Rates (FAIR) Act again this year. This time, they’re calling for a 3.5% federal pay raise in 2021.

     

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  • In the News: Citizens United decision weathers 10 years of controversy

    Citizens United decision weathers 10 years of controversy
    Alex Gangitano, The Hill

    A decade after the Supreme Court's landmark Citizens United decision, which ushered in the era of super PACs and unlimited donations, the fight over the contentious ruling shows no signs of easing.

    The case upended the campaign finance system, after the justices in a 5-4 ruling authored by Justice Anthony Kennedy on Jan. 21, 2010 found that restrictions on corporate campaign spending violated free speech. 

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  • In the News: Lawmakers: The US cannot afford another 10 years of Citizens United

    Lawmakers: The US cannot afford another 10 years of Citizens United
    Tom Udall and John Sarbanes, CNN (Op-Ed)

    Ten years ago, the Supreme Court's decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission unleashed a torrent of outside spending by corporations and wealthy donors who seized the opportunity to buy unlimited influence in Washington. The decision exponentially increased the amount of money in our politics and emboldened foreign actors to corrupt our elections. Our democracy has paid a heavy price.

    Since the Citizens United decision, just 10 individuals have injected more than $1.2 billion into our elections, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Secret money groups have poured $963 million into ads without telling voters who paid for them. And Americans have no way of knowing how much foreign money has infiltrated our elections.

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  • In the News: ‘Your Voice’ Interview on Impeachment and Citizens United Anniversary

    ‘Your Voice’ Interview on Impeachment and Citizens United Anniversary
    WBFF-TV (FOX)

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